Input is needed from Mum and Dad

When a couple separates, there is sometimes a major dispute when parents or caregivers can't agree on the care arrangements for their children. Communication has broken down and mediation hasn't worked, so one parent (or both) applies to the Family Court to decide the details of the children's care. Read more…

Family protection and wills

The wise and just will-maker

I need to make a will but I do not want to leave my estate to my son as I never see him. I also do not want to leave my estate to my stepchildren. What can be done? Read more…

A cost-effective alternative to court

After separating, you could find yourself at loggerheads with your former partner or spouse on exactly how all property should be divided between you. Negotiations may be bouncing between your lawyers, with no common ground achieved. Without agreement, you could file court proceedings but learn costs would increase dramatically. As well, it could be years before a judge can give a decision on how your property will be divided.  Read more…

The Law Commission has proposed some significant changes to the way relationship property is dealt with by separating couples. Read more…

For better, for worse?
The law governing the division of property when a relationship ends is, after more than 40 years, set to change following the Law Commission's comprehensive review of the Property (Relationships) Act 1976 (the PRA). 

The Law Commission has identified changes that it believes should be made to ensure the regime better reflects the reasonable expectations of New Zealanders. We set out some of the proposals that may be relevant to you or your family.  Read more…

When you hear the word 'inheritance', what is your first thought? Is it positive or negative? Do you think about what you could receive from your parents, or what you might pass on to your children? Answers will vary, but generally the term 'inheritance' carries positive connotations. The Oxford Dictionary defines an 'inheritance' as 'a thing that is inherited'. More helpfully, Wikipedia defines it as 'the practice of passing on property, titles, debts, rights, and obligations upon the death of an individual'.

For this article, however, we're focussing on 'debts' rather than actual things. What happens when your parents die broke? Can you inherit a debt? Read more…

Downie Stewart Lawyers Dunedin 8th Level, 265 Princes St, Dunedin, 9016 03-477 2263
PO Box 1345, Dunedin 9054 |  Fax: 03 477 4021  |  E: info@downiestewart.co.nz